Getting massive number of users is the easier part



  • @in-cred-u-lous As an end-user, I would be very underwhelmed with any third-party services that merely use Sia, like Dropbox uses S3, but without exposing Sia's guarantees of client-side encryption, redundancy and distributedness directly to me.
    It'd be just another cloud service and I would honestly feel no incentive to use it compared to established ones just because it uses Sia in the background.

    Since I'd much, much rather be able to keep using Sia or a tweaked front-end to Sia directly (though maybe not a "full" client), I have a question: is it really necessary to download the (whole) blockchain, if all you're going to do is rent and make payments, but never receive payments or mine?
    You seemed to point to blockchain download as the major obstacle to direct end-user adoption in the long term.



  • @halpmon said:

    If you want the network to grow, make Siacoin idiot proof first. Otherwise, it will be just a nerd coin at best.

    This is an extremely vital part of making the technology successful and should be treated as a high priority in my opinion. The early adopters are your biggest allies.

    Yes, I understand that one of the biggest targets of this technology is enterprise, but early adopters are vital to marketing efforts and getting a functioning economy in place. It's much easier to go for the little people first than it is to go for selling a solution to DropBox. A company like DropBox is not going to use your service, even if it's cheaper than S3, unless it's well tested with a suitable proof of concept. The early adopters are the proof of concept, and the testing, they are the pitch to the big investors, "look, we have all of these people using the network already, we have a functioning economy in place, this actually works."

    So I do agree, it should be as simple to use as DropBox, and your biggest appeal will be to users who can make money for free by running an application on their computer and doing nothing with it. People with decent internet connections and a decent hard drive, but no income, can leave this software running on their computer and generate money out of seemingly thin air. That's your initial target market. Not enterprise, they need to trust Sia first, and that comes with time and a functioning, proven and stable system. These big companies are much more risk averse than little companies and individuals looking to make a few dollars on the side. You need to build your way up, you can't reach the roof without a ladder.

    Since I'd much, much rather be able to keep using Sia or a tweaked front-end to Sia directly (though maybe not a "full" client), I have a question: is it really necessary to download the (whole) blockchain, if all you're going to do is rent and make payments, but never receive payments or mine?
    You seemed to point to blockchain download as the major obstacle to direct end-user adoption in the long term.

    I agree with this sentiment, and I'm curious to know the answer to this question as well. Is there no SPV type system for Sia? Because ideally an end user will be able to use a dedicated client (like the DropBox software) that interfaces with Sia directly but has all of the functionality of DropBox.



  • @TheLast said:

    Is there no SPV type system for Sia?

    Not currently, but my understanding is that there is no technical reason why there can't be one, although @Taek mentioned that it might be easier to start with pruning nodes instead of SPV nodes.



  • I have real life example about why is dropbox so good (I don't compare it with sia).

    There is public directory in dropbox which is not public but let me right click on any file and copy public link to that file. This way I can link to my 50MB file in email in just 5 sec. All competitors think that If they give me more free GB it will solve these small practical things.

    There are tons of competitors thinking this wrong way. I will never open web interface to do the same in over complicated way taking me minutes to do.

    If sia developers find time for such small but useful things it would help adoption alot.



  • You can obtain a .sia file through siac (or, I assume, Sia-UI, but I don't use that) and share it with others; then they can use it with their own Sia client to download the file.
    That's the way sharing works in Sia.



  • It was only small example how simple but highly efficient feature can change everything.

    Maybe for Sia is not the goal be able to share one file with one click. It could be virtual hard drive or something else.

    Now I think developers have enough work with the core functionality. But later would be great not forget about simple users and small features that can make sia #1.



  • I think it's important to make the core both solid and flexible in a way that will allow all sorts of "convenience features" to be implemented. Those will come with time, but they need good foundations. So far, I like Sia's foundations.



  • If you want corporate clients you are going to have to be ready for penetration testing, not losing the files is almost unimportant, compared to having a clients files released in a wikileaks style expose.

    In fact I think this is where Sia may have distinct advantage over the other efforts in this area, a corporate client is going to want a contractual agreement with someone, underwriting the risks, somone who will provide warranties and indemnities, SLAs and KPIs. If I was procuring this service, thats what I would want. I cant imagine an executive going to the company board with a proposal and not have this buttoned down.



  • Corporate clients? Who is first? Please list of possible candidates.

    Ethereum & Microsoft
    Sia & ?
    :smiley:


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